No matter whom you talk to about a potential roofing project, underlayments are sure to be a big part of the conversation.

No matter whom you talk to about a potential roofing project, underlayments are sure to be a big part of the conversation.

In this month’s issue of Roofing Contractor we examine the state of underlayments: what works and what doesn’t work, and what is new and what is old.

We know different climates require the use of a specific underlayment.

We know underlayments were originally used as temporary protection.

We know traditional felts are not as strong and durable as most underlayments.

We know synthetic underlayments continue to grow.

We know dry-in benefits and UV resistance of premium underlayment gives contractors greater flexibility in scheduling installations.

And we know the key ingredient to the success of underlayments is the ice and water protector used under shingles, metal and slate. We know all this because people like Tom Metoxen, Manager of Technical and Warranty Services for Carlisle Residential, who said underlayments are “better than ever.”

We know because Anthony Mass, technical administrator for Polyglass USA, said underlayments “provide a vital layer of protection on top of the sheathing to help keep moisture out of the building.”

We know because Atilla Sebuktekin, GAF-Elk Vice President of Marketing for Steep Slope Roofing and Decorative Stone Products, said there are “better quality underlayments for roof deck protection.”

We know because Sandro Di Pede of SDP Advanced Polymer Products said the key to synthetic acceptance is safety with respect to walkability on pitched roofs.

We know because Tarco President Steve Ratcliff said the underlayment marketplace is better because of the introduction of self-adhering and synthetic underlayments.

And we know because Edward Sueta, marketing manger at ALCO-NVC Inc., said the key ingredient to the success of underlayments is “the ice and water protector used under shingles, metal and slate.”

The fact is, underlayments are here to stay, here to improve, and here because the roofing industry would be nothing without it. Do you have any answers as to why underlayments are sure to be the topic of conversation for any roofing project?