Converting a roof designed and framed as flat into a tapered surface proved to be a very educational experience on a recent project in New Mexico. The Pueblo Pintado Day School, a new K-12 community school on a Navajo reservation near Albuquerque, was designed and built with a truly flat roof, which prevents water from efficiently draining from it.

After installing tapered polyiso to ensure proper drainage, the crew from DKG & Associates used GenFlex 60-mil TPO and accessories to finish the roof. (Photos courtesy of DKG & Associates.)


Converting a roof designed and framed as flat into a tapered surface proved to be a very educational experience on a recent project in New Mexico. The Pueblo Pintado Day School, a new K-12 community school on a Navajo reservation near Albuquerque, was designed and built with a truly flat roof, which prevents water from efficiently draining from it.

With a team of local Native American tradesmen, Weldon Good and his team at DKG & Associates Inc. studied up on his options and ultimately passed the test in record time.

Good relied on his strong relationship with his distributor, Victor Rosenthal at Ridgeline Supply Co. Inc., to determine the best approach. Together, they worked closely with GenFlex Roofing Systems to develop a tapered insulation solution to allow for water runoff.

“We relied on GenFlex to help in redesigning the tapered layout,” said Good, Vice President at DKG. “GenFlex provided a detailed schematic that was infinitely helpful.”

They used GenFlex Polyiso to create a 1/4-inch per foot slope to meet building code requirements. The finished product allows for all water to drain effectively off the roof.

DKG then used GenFlex 60-mil TPO and accessories to install the roof. The 70,000-square-foot project includes several buildings and is mechanically fastened.

The roof system was mechanically fastened. The 70,000-square-foot project includes several buildings.

Adding to the challenge, the school was in a remote location; the closest lodging was 75 miles from the jobsite. (It is a remote location even for the students, who are bused in for the school week and stay in dormitories at the school.) For the crew, the distance meant significantly increased travel time and reduced work time.

In addition, the project was completed in late fall and early winter. And even in New Mexico, temperatures can drop below 40 degrees, making work difficult. Some days, temperatures were too cold to use adhesives for the base flashings. But even if it meant slowing the project, Good maintained high standards to ensure the project was done well. Some days that meant confining work that required adhesives to a 30 to 60 minute window. Still, the crew finished the project ahead of schedule, spending a total of about three months on the roof.

“For the size of the job and the unique challenges they faced, it’s wonderful that the DKG team could install a good, solid roof in a short time frame,” said Rosenthal. “What’s more rewarding is the role they played in giving that community a school building they could be proud of.”



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