Today’s topic comes courtesy of Brett Hall of Joe Hall Roofing Co., Arlington, Texas, who alerted us to a potentially life-threatening problem that’s gotten some notoriety on the Dallas/Fort Worth evening news.

Today’s topic comes courtesy of Brett Hall of Joe Hall Roofing Co., Arlington, Texas, who alerted us to a potentially life-threatening problem that’s gotten some notoriety on the Dallas/Fort Worth evening news. He provided a link to some Channel 8 News video of the story, which detailed four incidents in the city of Mansfield in which roofing nails had punctured flexible gas lines in the attic during reroofing jobs.

The cases all involved gas lines made of corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) that were affixed directly to the underside of the roof deck and struck and punctured by roofing nails. According to the news report, the incidents involved different builders, different roofing companies, and different CSST manufacturers. In all cases, the gas lines were installed incorrectly, without the proper strike protection plates. The newscast advised all homeowners in North Texas contemplating roofing work to have a plumber inspect any gas lines in the attic.

How about you? Have you encountered gas lines that were improperly installed during reroofing jobs? If so, is this a problem that is limited to North Texas, or is this report just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak, with CSST becoming more prevalent since the mid-1980s? Let us know what you think. We’ll be chatting with Brett Hall to get some advice for contractors facing this problem.